Book Review: Of Marriageable Age by Sharon Mass

A saga of forbidden love and loss, of insurmountable desires and longing, of resistance and change… Of Marriageable Age narrates the story of three characters divided by time and space and yet intertwined together. Spanning across continents and decades, the novel intersperses a coming of age story of Nataraj, Savitri and Sarojini who refuse to…

Book Review: Deja Karma by Vish Dhamija

Best known for writing crime fiction, Vish Dhamija’s latest offering Deja Karma is a legal psychological fiction. Crowned as the India’s John Grisham, Vish Dhamija has undoubtedly stimulated the genre of legal fiction in India which was almost non-existent before the arrival of Dhamija on the scene. As suggested by the title, the book commences with…

Book Review: Soul Warrior by Falguni Kothari

In the last one decade, the Indian book market has seen a rapid upsurge of mythological fiction. Writers like Ashok Banker, Devdutt Pattanaik, Amish Tripathi has struck a chord with the young Indian readers who although seem reluctant to read the primary texts like The Mahabharata, The Ramayana, are more than interested in modern re-tellings of these…

Book Review: Kashmir House by Vikram Dhawan

“War is a continuation of policy by other means.” – Clausewitz Kashmir, described as a paradise on Earth has become one of the longest outstanding geopolitical conflict between two belligerent nations resulting in endless bloodshed, rise of terrorism, human rights violations, etc. It’s not that the conflict cannot be resolved if willed by those in power; however,…

Book Review: Partitions by Kamleshwar

The Fallacy of Documented History Napoleon once said, ‘What is history, but a fable agreed upon?’ Kamleshwar’s magnum opus Kitne Pakistan originally written in Hindi and translated as Partitions in English is developed around this premise, that is, constant writing and rewriting of history and the fallacy and inaccuracy of historical truth recorded through so called documentary…