Book Review: In the Shadows of Death by Sourabh Mukherjee

As The Millennium Series became a worldwide phenomenon, it almost became a fashion for new writers to write a psychological thriller; however, it’s not an easy genre to probe into. To quote Wikipedia, ‘Psychological thriller is a thriller story which emphasizes the psychology of its characters and their unstable emotional states.’ Psychological thrillers delve deep into the dark recesses of the minds…

Book Review: Menaka’s Choice by Kavita Kane

‘Apsara’ generally subsisting at the periphery of literature, quite often depicted for the consumption of a voyeur ends up being an object of sexual gratification rather than a living, flesh and blood character. Britannica’s description of ‘Apsara’ tersely sums up their prevailing representation in the works of literature, “Originally water nymphs, the apsaras provide sensual pleasure…

Book Review: Pigeons of the Dome: Stories on Communalism by Rakhshanda Jalil

Why Communalism? Rakshanda Jalil’s latest book, ‘Pigeons of the Dome: Stories on Communalism’ instantly catches the reader’s attention as its very title makes the reader think, Why Communalism? What more can be said about the topic that has not been told already? As if anticipating the questions, the editor writes in the ‘Introduction’ to the…

Book Review: Of Marriageable Age by Sharon Mass

A saga of forbidden love and loss, of insurmountable desires and longing, of resistance and change… Of Marriageable Age narrates the story of three characters divided by time and space and yet intertwined together. Spanning across continents and decades, the novel intersperses a coming of age story of Nataraj, Savitri and Sarojini who refuse to…

Book Review: Deja Karma by Vish Dhamija

Best known for writing crime fiction, Vish Dhamija’s latest offering Deja Karma is a legal psychological fiction. Crowned as the India’s John Grisham, Vish Dhamija has undoubtedly stimulated the genre of legal fiction in India which was almost non-existent before the arrival of Dhamija on the scene. As suggested by the title, the book commences with…